11 grammatical mistakes that instantly reveal people’s ignorance

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boss, meeting, work, employee

All it takes is a single tweet or text for some people to reveal their poor grasp of the English language.

Homophones — words that sound alike but are spelled differently — can be particularly pesky.

Regardless, you should never choose incorrectly in these nine situations:

1. ‘Your’ vs. ‘You’re’

“Your” is a possessive pronoun, while “you’re” is a contraction of “you are.”

Example 1: You’re pretty. 

Example 2: Give me some of your whiskey.

2. ‘It’s’ vs. ‘Its’

Normally, an apostrophe symbolizes possession, as in, “I took the dog’s bone.” But because apostrophes also replace omitted letters — as in “don’t” — the “it’s” vs. “its” decision gets complicated. 

Use “its” as the possessive pronoun and “it’s” for the shortened version of “it is.”

Example 1: The dog chewed on its bone.

Example 2: It’s raining.

3. ‘Then’ vs. ‘Than’

“Then” conveys time, while “than” is used for comparison. 

Example 1: We left the party and then went home.

Example 2: We would rather go home than stay at the party.

4. ‘There’ vs. ‘They’re’ vs. ‘Their’

“There” is a location. “Their” is a possessive pronoun. And “they’re” is a contraction of “they are.”

Use them wisely. 

5. ‘We’re’ vs. ‘Were’

“We’re” is a contraction of “we are” and “were” is the past tense of “are.”

6. ‘Affect’ vs. ‘Effect’

“Affect” is a verb and “effect” is a noun.

There are, however, rare exceptions. For example, someone can “effect change” and “affect” can be a psychological symptom. 

Example: How did that affect you? 

Example: What effect did that have on you?

7. ‘Two’ vs. ‘Too’ vs. ‘To’

“Two” is a number. 

“To” is a preposition. It’s used to express motion, although often not literally, toward a person, place, or thing.

And “too” is a synonym for “also.”

8. ‘Into’ vs. ‘In To’

“Into” is a preposition that indicates movement or transformation, while “in to,” as two separate words, does not.

Example: We drove the car into the lake. 

Example: I turned my test in to the teacher. 

In the latter example, if you wrote “into,” you’re implying you literally changed your test into your teacher.

9. ‘Alot’

“Alot” isn’t a word. This phrase is always two separate words: a lot.

10. ‘Who’ vs. ‘Whom’

Use who to refer to the subject of a sentence and whom to refer to the object of the verb or preposition. Shortcut: Remember that who does it to whom.

Example: Who ate my sandwich?

Example: Whom should I ask?

11. ‘Whose’ vs. ‘Who’s’

Use “whose” to assign ownership to someone and “who’s” as the contraction of “who is.”

Example: Whose backpack is on that table?

Example: Who’s going to the movies tonight?

Christina Sterbenz contributed to a previous version of this story.

SEE ALSO: The 10 best MBA programs you can finish while keeping your day job

Join the conversation about this story »

May 29, 2017 at 11:57PM

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from Abby Jackson

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One chart shows how many millionaires and billionaires graduated from Harvard, Stanford, MIT, and 17 other top colleges

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Society seems to be obsessed with rich people. We seek their advice, study their habits, and replicate their wealth-building strategies.

But the richest of the rich have more in common than a risk-taking attitude and an early morning routine.

Wealth-X, a firm that does research and valuations on ultra-high net worth (UHNW) individuals, recently revealed where the world’s wealthiest people — those with assets exceeding $30 million — went to college.

Counting alumni with both undergraduate and graduate degrees and leaving out those with diplomas, certificates, honorary degrees, and drop outs, Wealth-X determined which alma maters the world’s richest people share.

Harvard University is the former stomping ground to 1,906 millionaires and billionaires, which together command a net worth of $811 billion, more than twice that of the No. 2 school, University of Pennsylvania.

All together, five colleges with the richest alumni are public universities, six are Ivy League, and only one is located outside of the US. Though a degree from one of these schools won’t guarantee wealth, the odds may be in your favor if history is any indication. 

Check out the schools with the most millionaire and billionaire alumni in the chart below:

BI Graphics_Colleges with richest alumni

 A few more insights from the Wealth-X report:

  • Stanford UHNW alumni have the highest average net worth of $263 million
  • Harvard has the most living billionaire alumni with 131 — a combined fortune of $528 billion
  • The majority of UHNW alumni are men, ranging from 88% at Boston University to 96% at MIT and University of Notre Dame
  • The majority of UHNW alumni are self-made, with the highest percentage (83%) coming from University of Virginia

SEE ALSO: These 10 American colleges have minted almost 400 billionaires

DON’T MISS: The 20 colleges that have created the most millionaires and billionaires

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Here’s a month-by-month timeline of the best time to buy almost anything in 2017

May 29, 2017 at 11:24PM

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from Tanza Loudenback and Skye Gould

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Why valedictorians rarely become rich and famous — and the average millionaire’s college GPA is 2.9

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graduation

If you opened this article thinking you’d find evidence of why students who graduate at the top of their high-school class go onto become lazy bums, well, you won’t find it.

A Boston University researcher who followed valedictorians and salutatorians into adulthood found that most did in fact achieve the traditional markers of success. Nearly everyone graduated from college, where their average GPA was 3.6; the majority went on to earn a graduate degree; and nearly half landed in top-tier professional jobs.

So far, so expected.

“But how many of these number one high-school performers go on to change the world, run the world, or impress the world? The answer seems to be clear: zero.”

The above is a quotation from Eric Barker’s new book, “Barking Up the Wrong Tree,” where he cites the Boston University research.

Barker’s point is that while top students generally go on to be successful, few of them go on to achieve the kind of wild success most of us dream of.

Instead, kids who struggle with, or don’t particularly enjoy, formal education are more likely to get there. In fact, a study of 700 American millionaires found that their average GPA was just 2.9.

There are two potential reasons for this phenomenon, Barker writes:

1. “Schools reward students who consistently do what they are told” — and life rewards people who shake things up.

Karen Arnold, the Boston University researcher, told Barker: “Essentially, we are rewarding conformity and the willingness to go along with the system.”

In other words, the valedictorians found out exactly what the teachers wanted and delivered it consistently.

But if you think about the world’s most influential thinkers and leaders, most came up with an out-of-the-box solution to some political or scientific issue. Going along with what was already working moderately well never made anyone famous.

When he visited the Business Insider office in May, Barker explained: “In school, rules are very clear. In life, rules are not so clear. So a certain amount of not playing by the rules is advantageous once you get out of a closed system like education.”

Man Studying2. “Schools reward being a generalist” and the real world rewards passion and expertise.

Barker explains that, even if you’re fascinated by history in high school, you can’t spend all your time studying the European Renaissance. At some point, you’ve got to stop and move onto your math homework.

But once you’re in the working world, you’ll need to excel in a particular domain — and other knowledge or skills won’t matter so much.

And here’s the real shocker: Arnold found that intellectual students who genuinely enjoy learning tend to struggle in high school. They find the education system “stifling” because it doesn’t allow them to pursue their passions deeply.

Barker summed up all the research nicely in the interview with Business Insider: “Valedictorians often go on to be the people who support the system — they become a part of the system — but they don’t change the system or overthrow the system.”

None of this is to say, of course, that if you were your high-school valedictorian, you’ll never achieve big-time success. You might very well.

But you’ll have to keep in mind that playing by the rules won’t get you as far as it once did. Taking risks and going against the grain — “sticking it to the man,” if you will — is harder to do, but it’ll get you farther.

SEE ALSO: Ask yourself 4 questions to figure out if you’re successful

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: A Stanford neuroscientist reveals something ‘puzzling’ in people who are extremely successful

May 29, 2017 at 10:40PM

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from Shana Lebowitz

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Why valedictorians rarely become rich and famous — and the average millionaire’s college GPA is 2.9

http://ift.tt/2r4M0cU

graduation

If you opened this article thinking you’d find evidence of why students who graduate at the top of their high-school class go onto become lazy bums, well, you won’t find it.

A Boston University researcher who followed valedictorians and salutatorians into adulthood found that most did in fact achieve the traditional markers of success. Nearly everyone graduated from college, where their average GPA was 3.6; the majority went on to earn a graduate degree; and nearly half landed in top-tier professional jobs.

So far, so expected.

“But how many of these number one high-school performers go on to change the world, run the world, or impress the world? The answer seems to be clear: zero.”

The above is a quotation from Eric Barker’s new book, “Barking Up the Wrong Tree,” where he cites the Boston University research.

Barker’s point is that while top students generally go on to be successful, few of them go on to achieve the kind of wild success most of us dream of.

Instead, kids who struggle with, or don’t particularly enjoy, formal education are more likely to get there. In fact, a study of 700 American millionaires found that their average GPA was just 2.9.

There are two potential reasons for this phenomenon, Barker writes:

1. “Schools reward students who consistently do what they are told” — and life rewards people who shake things up.

Karen Arnold, the Boston University researcher, told Barker: “Essentially, we are rewarding conformity and the willingness to go along with the system.”

In other words, the valedictorians found out exactly what the teachers wanted and delivered it consistently.

But if you think about the world’s most influential thinkers and leaders, most came up with an out-of-the-box solution to some political or scientific issue. Going along with what was already working moderately well never made anyone famous.

When he visited the Business Insider office in May, Barker explained: “In school, rules are very clear. In life, rules are not so clear. So a certain amount of not playing by the rules is advantageous once you get out of a closed system like education.”

Man Studying2. “Schools reward being a generalist” and the real world rewards passion and expertise.

Barker explains that, even if you’re fascinated by history in high school, you can’t spend all your time studying the European Renaissance. At some point, you’ve got to stop and move onto your math homework.

But once you’re in the working world, you’ll need to excel in a particular domain — and other knowledge or skills won’t matter so much.

And here’s the real shocker: Arnold found that intellectual students who genuinely enjoy learning tend to struggle in high school. They find the education system “stifling” because it doesn’t allow them to pursue their passions deeply.

Barker summed up all the research nicely in the interview with Business Insider: “Valedictorians often go on to be the people who support the system — they become a part of the system — but they don’t change the system or overthrow the system.”

None of this is to say, of course, that if you were your high-school valedictorian, you’ll never achieve big-time success. You might very well.

But you’ll have to keep in mind that playing by the rules won’t get you as far as it once did. Taking risks and going against the grain — “sticking it to the man,” if you will — is harder to do, but it’ll get you farther.

SEE ALSO: Ask yourself 4 questions to figure out if you’re successful

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: A Stanford neuroscientist reveals something ‘puzzling’ in people who are extremely successful

May 29, 2017 at 10:40PM

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from Shana Lebowitz

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Why valedictorians rarely become rich and famous — and the average millionaire’s college GPA is 2.9

http://ift.tt/2r4M0cU

graduation

If you opened this article thinking you’d find evidence of why students who graduate at the top of their high-school class go onto become lazy bums, well, you won’t find it.

A Boston University researcher who followed valedictorians and salutatorians into adulthood found that most did in fact achieve the traditional markers of success. Nearly everyone graduated from college, where their average GPA was 3.6; the majority went on to earn a graduate degree; and nearly half landed in top-tier professional jobs.

So far, so expected.

“But how many of these number one high-school performers go on to change the world, run the world, or impress the world? The answer seems to be clear: zero.”

The above is a quotation from Eric Barker’s new book, “Barking Up the Wrong Tree,” where he cites the Boston University research.

Barker’s point is that while top students generally go on to be successful, few of them go on to achieve the kind of wild success most of us dream of.

Instead, kids who struggle with, or don’t particularly enjoy, formal education are more likely to get there. In fact, a study of 700 American millionaires found that their average GPA was just 2.9.

There are two potential reasons for this phenomenon, Barker writes:

1. “Schools reward students who consistently do what they are told” — and life rewards people who shake things up.

Karen Arnold, the Boston University researcher, told Barker: “Essentially, we are rewarding conformity and the willingness to go along with the system.”

In other words, the valedictorians found out exactly what the teachers wanted and delivered it consistently.

But if you think about the world’s most influential thinkers and leaders, most came up with an out-of-the-box solution to some political or scientific issue. Going along with what was already working moderately well never made anyone famous.

When he visited the Business Insider office in May, Barker explained: “In school, rules are very clear. In life, rules are not so clear. So a certain amount of not playing by the rules is advantageous once you get out of a closed system like education.”

Man Studying2. “Schools reward being a generalist” and the real world rewards passion and expertise.

Barker explains that, even if you’re fascinated by history in high school, you can’t spend all your time studying the European Renaissance. At some point, you’ve got to stop and move onto your math homework.

But once you’re in the working world, you’ll need to excel in a particular domain — and other knowledge or skills won’t matter so much.

And here’s the real shocker: Arnold found that intellectual students who genuinely enjoy learning tend to struggle in high school. They find the education system “stifling” because it doesn’t allow them to pursue their passions deeply.

Barker summed up all the research nicely in the interview with Business Insider: “Valedictorians often go on to be the people who support the system — they become a part of the system — but they don’t change the system or overthrow the system.”

None of this is to say, of course, that if you were your high-school valedictorian, you’ll never achieve big-time success. You might very well.

But you’ll have to keep in mind that playing by the rules won’t get you as far as it once did. Taking risks and going against the grain — “sticking it to the man,” if you will — is harder to do, but it’ll get you farther.

SEE ALSO: Ask yourself 4 questions to figure out if you’re successful

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: A Stanford neuroscientist reveals something ‘puzzling’ in people who are extremely successful

May 29, 2017 at 10:40PM

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from Shana Lebowitz

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10 former Navy SEALs, Green Berets, and other veterans share their best advice for leaving the military and transitioning to civilian work

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United States Marine Corps senior drill instructor Parris Island

This Memorial Day, Americans will take time to reflect on those who have served in our nation’s military.

But what of those individuals whose time in the military is coming to an end? What resources and insight can be offered to the men and women transitioning from the military back to civilian careers?

A number of organizations including American Dream U, the Honor Foundation, CivCom, the Mission Continues, the Heroes Journey, and Victor App, strive to provide support for this community of veterans. Certain companies also strive to hire veterans and provide military-friendly environments.

Business Insider spoke with 10 veterans from several different branches of the military about transitioning back to civilian careers.

Here’s their best advice for people considering leaving the military:

SEE ALSO: 29 American presidents who served in the military

Start preparing as soon as possible

Omari Broussard joined the Navy about three weeks after graduating high school at the age of 17. He says he enjoyed his subsequent 20-year career, during which he rose to the rank of Navy Chief. However, as the father of six kids with an interest in starting his own business, he knew at some point he’d have to move on.

“I loved it, but it was a conflict, between missing out on family time and becoming and entrepreneur,” he tells Business Insider.

Broussard says that the most crucial part of transitioning from military to civilian work is preparation. It’s advice he’s shared with his fellow attendees at American Dream U, an organization that helps veterans transition to civilian life.

“As a military member, you only get so much time to prepare, but that doesn’t mean you don’t get any time to prepare,” says Broussard, who is now the founder of counter-ambush training class 10X Defense and author of “Immediate Action Marketing.” “I retired in 2015. My preparations for getting out started in 2007.”

Getting ready included earning his degree in organizational security management at the University of Phoenix, becoming a firearms instructor on the side, and laying the groundwork for founding his own business.

“The military gave me more of the framing and the conditioning,” he says. “The skills I had to go out and get on my own.”

“Start early,” says James Byrne, who served as a US Navy SEAL officer for 26 years. “You need to start planning your exit when you start the service.”

However, Byrne, who now works as the director of sales and business development at solar tech company Envision Solar, tells Business Insider that doesn’t mean you should divide your attention.

“I don’t mean one foot in, one foot out,” he says. “In order to do what we do, you have to have a complete commitment to our mission in special operations. But get your education. Get your medical VA stuff in order. Keep everything up to date.”

Byrne is a fellow at the Honor Foundation, a group that specifically helps Navy SEALs transition back to civilian careers and life. He says that he’s seen many people simply become overwhelmed by the process of leaving the military.

“It’s not so much that any one part of the transition is really that hard,” he says. “The problem is when it all comes together at one point — that’s what makes it hard and overwhelming. The better you can prepare in those different areas, the better it’s going to be. You can’t wait till three months before you get out.”

Brace yourself for a major culture shift

Retired Green Beret Scott Mann has a total of 23 years of experience in the army. Today, he runs a leadership training organization MannUp and the Heroes Journey, a non-profit devoted to helping veterans transition.

“As a warrior, you live in a honor-based culture,” Mann tells Business Insider. “It is tribal, in the sense that tribal society is built around the group, honor, and it’s about the collective. If you’re in the military, or a military dependent, your relationship with your teammates is tribal — you took the needs of the many in front of your own needs. That’s how you fight, train, and survive, and it becomes trained within you.”

On the other hand, the civilian job landscape tends to be far more individualistic.

“Bam, you’re out and you’re in this world that’s the polar opposite of that, where it’s a society that values the individual above the group, puts the needs of one in front of the many,” says Mann, who also authored “Mission America,” a book breaking down insight on the life after the military. “It’s literally like changing planets. It’s not that one is better than the other, but each is necessary in its own way.”

He says that high-performing military veterans must brace for that extreme change, as well as learn to tell their stories and translate their own experiences in the civilian world.

Kayla Williams is a US army veteran who now works as the director of the Center for Women Veterans at the Department of Veterans Affairs. She’s collaborated with veterans’ transition group the Mission Continues in the past, serving as a panelist at a recent talk.

She tells Business Insider that civilian workplaces also tend to be far less hiearchical and structured.

“It was also a challenge to not feel the same deep sense of purpose that infused my daily life while in the military, which is what ultimately drove me to work at the Department of Veterans Affairs: I wanted to serve in a new way,” she says.

Know what you want

After a brief stint as a financial planner in DC, Randy Kelley served as a Navy SEAL sniper for 11 years. Since retiring in 2005, he has found his calling as an entrepreneur and built up seven different companies.

He tells Business Insider that ancient military stategist Sun Tzu is the inspiration behind his top advice for other recent veterans: “Know yourself.”

“You’ve got to know yourself first, what you’re good at, what you like to do, where you can provide value, and basically, what is your competitive advantage?” Kelley says. “I’m an entrepreneur. I’m very good at building ideas, and not so good at organization. I’m not going to be an accountant. It’s just not going to happen. I’m not going to be a project manager.”

Kelley, who founded the wellness startup Dasein Institute and has collaborated with American Dream U, recommends that veterans boil down their favorite aspects of their military career to figure out a new path forward.

“Do you like tasks or do you like missions?” he asks. “If you’re a mission-oriented guy, like I am personally, you want to know what the big picture is. You want to know what needs to get done. If you’re a task-oriented person, you like stability and you like a consistent paycheck and those kind of things, and you need to follow a separate route.”

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

May 29, 2017 at 09:34PM

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from Áine Cain

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Rebranding Strategy Guide

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 Rebranding Strategy Guide

Rebranding is one of the most difficult brand strategies to pull off successfully. Many try, many fail. To help marketers better understand when a rebrand is prudent, we asked the Branding Strategy Insider team to share their views.

Hilton Barbour: Rebrands Offer Opportunity

Rebranding initiatives are typically driven by a need to reignite sluggish performance, capitalize on a new positioning or highlight the arrival of a post-M&A brand. In many cases the focus of these initiatives is external and therefore marketers look to rebrand for maximum impact among customers, prospects, partners and suppliers.

While these audiences are crucial, too little attention is often given to the key internal audience – employees. Rebranding offers two significant opportunities to galvanize employees. One, the sheer visibility of a rebranding can generate excitement and interest internally. Two, and this is a larger and more considered opportunity, a rebranding can create an environment to re-evaluate the organization’s culture and the possibility to move it in a new direction. Initiating a culture change should always be underpinned by a genuine strategic need and a rebranding can provide that legitimate opportunity. To be effective leaders must go deeper than making cosmetic changes during a rebranding. By grasping the fuller opportunity to re-evaluate, inspire and galvanize the employees with a cultural re-set, the true possibilities of a rebranding can be realized.

Geoff Colon: A Rebrand Is Not The Same As A Repositioning

Repositioning used to happen when brands wanted to fit a new era they were entering, usually through a logo upgrade or a new audio jingle that updated their look and feel. Repositioning usually meant the same products and services from the brand, possibly issued in new packaging or in new formats.

In rebranding, the brand is literally offering new solutions, products and services that don’t fit their past identity. They may be entering entirely new verticals. A rebrand usually comes at a point that a brand has new products, services and solutions or is entering ambiguous territory where the original brand doesn’t resonate and it’s about to issue new products and services. Many of these rebranding updates now come as a result of new executive leadership, new services and new product lines.

In a world where communication has been leveled to 140 character tweets and 5 second video snippets, how a brand garners attention, even among its own loyal fans, is a new art form. In the disruptive brand world, even negative sentiment around a rebrand can capture enough attention from people to the point where many may even be prompted to ask, “What is that brand,” “What is that brand up to?” or “What is that brand doing?” In the past we may have thought negatively if people asked these questions, but in our present and future always-on, non-loyal, momentary world, rebranding can do wonders to wake up current and potential customers from the paradox of choice stupor and light up awareness in ways that simple repositioning cannot.

Derrick Daye: Rebrands Must Mirror The Truth

Successful rebrands reflect the fundamental nature of the way a brand does business. If rebranding does not accurately communicate this, in time the brand will be unmasked and the true inner-workings of the business will be revealed.

To their credit and shame BP provides a textbook case where both rebranding and repositioning were brilliantly conceived and executed. It’s worth retelling for those considering a rebrand. British Petroleum recognized the opportunity to be the world’s first environmentally friendly fossil fuels brand brand. The world was eager to embrace such a brand that was now actively “exploring new ways to live without oil” and BP appeared to have the strategic intent and capability to bring that vision to life. British Petroleum was redefined as Beyond Petroleum, and in time research confirmed that consumers had indeed become believers. Landor’s own brand research revealed that BP was seen as the most environmental fossil fuels brand, with more than half the market agreeing that it had become “more green”. BP’s brand awareness shot up from 4% in 2000 to 67% in 2007.

But then their negligence caused the loss of human life and an environmental crisis that revealed the thin veil between what they were saying about themselves and the truth, and BP’s brand achievements quickly plummeted. The learning here is that rebrands must be strictly guided by an honest self-assessment. In the end, the truth will prevail. The truth will anchor or sink your success.

Mark Di Somma: Rebrands Are Radical

A rebrand marks the end of the brand as it was. It’s a walk away from everything you were, and as such, should be reserved for situations when you want to disassociate your brand from its current reputation. It should not be confused with a brand positioning, where you rework the current brand to make it more competitive, or a brand refresh, where you adjust the brand code to pursue new opportunities. To pull off such a disruptive decision, you need to go ‘all-in’. You need to relaunch with a fundamentally different brand DNA, probably a new business model and a reworked brand culture. You also need to explain clearly to the market why you’ve changed, what you’ve changed to and how they will see this manifest for them.

Be very clear about the customer benefits of the rebrand, not just your reasons and keep those front-of-mind throughout the rebranding process. The decision to rebrand is a lot bigger, more involved and more risky than ongoing refreshment. You should only seriously look at such a radical step if the story that your brand has told is no longer valuable, if the goals for the change are very clear and if the rebrand itself is accompanied by significant changes across the business and the culture that put you in a position of unprecedented advantage.

Finally, be patient. Rebranding is something that should be done with the wider business and with an unwavering eye on the business strategy going forward. Take the time to include, consult and decide. The excitement of rebranding should always be overshadowed by the responsibility of getting it right. Finally, and perhaps most importantly of all, rebrand within timeframes and market conditions that give you the greatest degree of control. Attempting to do this while the business is rapidly declining or the market is in recession will only add further pressure to a process that requires big decisions and has major implications.

Paul Friederichsen: Rebrands Are Shaped From The Inside Out

Appearances are just that. Meaningless really, unless they’re an authentic reflection of what’s behind the new look: a new mission, an altered or expanded strategy, or a change in corporate ownership or merger, just to mention a few.

“Changing your colors” does not a rebranding make, even though an identity change in itself can be a massive and complex process. Graphics are only one part (though an important part to be sure) of what makes a brand unique, valued and meaningful to its customers. They should be a signal of what has happened, not the sum of all that has happened.

Mark Ritson: Rebrands Need Every Ego On Board

As a consultant I failed the first big global client I ever worked for. I failed because I did not advise them to do something I have come to see as vital to successful corporate rebranding: build a brand team. Not a team of marketing people and the ad agency, but a true cross-functional team that draws on senior people from manufacturing, HR, sales and the board of directors. It should include internal heroes who are widely respected and who know how the culture and politics of the firm actually work.

Different egos and interests all collide around the corporate brand and this can make brand development more complex. However, it is better to discover and resolve these divergent views as part of the branding process than have them emerge after the brand has been developed and communicated to key stakeholders.

If you ever find yourself presenting the ‘new’ corporate brand to senior managers, you have already failed. Branding should be an inclusive, engaged process. If senior management feels that they have been consulted and involved in a rebranding, they are more likely to apply the new brand strategy and will embolden the initiative with a credibility often lacking in the marketing department. Get all of the egos on board early and often.

The Blake Project Can Help: Please email us for more about our rebranding expertise.

Branding Strategy Insider is a service of The Blake Project: A strategic brand consultancy specializing in Brand Research, Brand Strategy, Brand Licensing and Brand Education

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May 29, 2017 at 07:33PM

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from Derrick Daye

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