How Human Emotion Influences Buying Behavior (And Marketers Can Use it)

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Despite millions of years of evolution and the development of abstract thought and critical thinking, humans still rely heavily on emotions when making decisions.

That’s right, regardless of all…

(For the full post, please click the blog title link above.)

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April 13, 2017 at 05:01PM

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from dbaum@impactbnd.com (Dan Baum)

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In Defense of Sean Spicer

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Sean Spicer is an idiot, of course, in service to a numbskull, and deserves ridicule for much of what he says from his White House podium. But not everything. Piling on — assuming your opponents are always and everywhere wrong about everything — is as ugly when progressives and Democrats … Continue reading

April 13, 2017 at 04:42PM

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from tomlewis8657@gmail.com (Tom Lewis)

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In Defense of Sean Spicer

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Spicer.jpg

Sean Spicer is an idiot, of course, in service to a numbskull, and deserves ridicule for much of what he says from his White House podium. But not everything. Piling on — assuming your opponents are always and everywhere wrong about everything — is as ugly when progressives and Democrats … Continue reading

April 13, 2017 at 04:42PM

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from tomlewis8657@gmail.com (Tom Lewis)

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Dignity And Devotion: Rex Freitas’ Gifts To His Parents.

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Bus driver, Rex Freitas continues to recover from an injury to his neck and back, suffered in a pothole incident. But he is also still wrestling with the pain of remembering his parents decline into poor health.

“We grew up with very little money to spare,” he said. “But my parents always had plenty of love to share. They believed in hugs, not handshakes. I feel very lucky that in their final years I was able to give back some of that love by taking good care of them,” he says. “More than anything, I wanted them to have dignity. They were too proud to go on welfare. Too proud to ask for help. So I took care of everything. And if they were still here, I would do it all over again. I wish I could have them again even for just for 10 minutes. They were everything to me.”

Freitas mother’s health began to decline seriously in 1986, when she was rushed to the hospital in great pain. “We learned that she had probably been suffering from lupus for years but it had not been diagnosed properly and therefore she did not get the treatment she needed early,” he said.

That was the beginning of a series of medical challenges: kidney failure, gallstones, thyroid surgery, two brain aneurysms. “She wanted to be in her own home. So my father and I looked after her better than any nurse could, and don’t get me wrong, there were a lot of ups and downs,” he says. “My friends helped me renovate her bathroom so that she could sit and take a nice, long shower. We used to spirit her out of the hospital to enjoy that shower at home, and then take her back,” he recalls with satisfaction.

As the driver of the No. 6 Bus through Pauoa, Freitas was able to manage his schedule in such a way that he could stop by to visit his mother, change her dressings, help his father tend to her needs, make sure his parents were doing all right, and return to work.

“I am grateful to my company and the type of job I have, because of the flexibility of scheduling, I could run in on my five minute breaks to check in on her and my dad,” he says. “Most people have to struggle to hang on to their jobs while caring for their kupuna and not many are able to manage their responsibilities the way I could and still keep working and drawing a salary,” he said.

“If we had had the Kupuna Caregivers Assistance then, we could have used it to hire a trained female caregiver. I am sure my mother appreciated everything we did for her, but she would have welcomed having a woman to help her shower and dress. But we did the best we could to preserve her dignity,” he said.

Freitas took care of the bills his parents incurred as first his mother, then his father succumbed to illness. “My father became very ill shortly after my mother died, so my caregiving responsibilities continued even after my mother passed away. Dad did his best for my mom for as long as he could despite being ill–and nine months later, he was gone too.”

“I wish I had received better advice along the way,” he said. “For example, we did not know we could take advantage of a special fund set up at the hospital by a donor to help native Hawaiians until my mother passed away. I did not know what I had to pay and what I was no longer responsible for. So, I kept paying and paying, until long after she died,” she added.

Early habits of thrift and savings served him well. “Ever since I was little, I learned to save my lunch money. I used to caddy and instead of accepting a free lunch as a reward, I would ask for the cost of the lunch in cash instead and add that to my savings,” he explains. Those savings over many years allowed him to buy the comfortable, squeaky clean bungalow in Pauao that he lived in with his parents until they passed away. “I didn’t want to make my dad feel bad. So I did not tell him that I bought the house from my grandparents. But doing so meant they had no rent to pay and could spend their Social Security on other necessities. Their combined total social security was $538, and that’s all they got every month” he added.

Rex Freitas’ story is the story of thousands of unpaid family caregivers across Hawaii. Like so many others, Freitas was driven by the desire to do the best he possibly could for his parents.

Freitas’ caregiving story is the story of the search for dignity and respect and solidarity as we age that Ai-jen Poo writes about movingly in her book, The Age of Dignity. In arguing for the urgent necessity to build an infrastructure of care to support the swelling ranks of the elders in America, she says:

Turning to one another means rendering visible how we are already, and have always been, interconnected through care. Nearly as invisible as the oxygen we breathe, and yet just as essential, care is the beating heart of our nation.

Rex Freitas has not read the book. But he has lived its lessons. He looks forward to legislators in Hawaii feeling the same urgency to support caregivers who stretch themselves to perform well in their paid jobs while doing as well at their unpaid labor of love. He hopes fervently that SB534/HB607 will make it through the legislature this year.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

April 13, 2017 at 04:33AM

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from Dawn Morais

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Dignity And Devotion: Rex Freitas’ Gifts To His Parents.

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Bus driver, Rex Freitas continues to recover from an injury to his neck and back, suffered in a pothole incident. But he is also still wrestling with the pain of remembering his parents decline into poor health.

“We grew up with very little money to spare,” he said. “But my parents always had plenty of love to share. They believed in hugs, not handshakes. I feel very lucky that in their final years I was able to give back some of that love by taking good care of them,” he says. “More than anything, I wanted them to have dignity. They were too proud to go on welfare. Too proud to ask for help. So I took care of everything. And if they were still here, I would do it all over again. I wish I could have them again even for just for 10 minutes. They were everything to me.”

Freitas mother’s health began to decline seriously in 1986, when she was rushed to the hospital in great pain. “We learned that she had probably been suffering from lupus for years but it had not been diagnosed properly and therefore she did not get the treatment she needed early,” he said.

That was the beginning of a series of medical challenges: kidney failure, gallstones, thyroid surgery, two brain aneurysms. “She wanted to be in her own home. So my father and I looked after her better than any nurse could, and don’t get me wrong, there were a lot of ups and downs,” he says. “My friends helped me renovate her bathroom so that she could sit and take a nice, long shower. We used to spirit her out of the hospital to enjoy that shower at home, and then take her back,” he recalls with satisfaction.

As the driver of the No. 6 Bus through Pauoa, Freitas was able to manage his schedule in such a way that he could stop by to visit his mother, change her dressings, help his father tend to her needs, make sure his parents were doing all right, and return to work.

“I am grateful to my company and the type of job I have, because of the flexibility of scheduling, I could run in on my five minute breaks to check in on her and my dad,” he says. “Most people have to struggle to hang on to their jobs while caring for their kupuna and not many are able to manage their responsibilities the way I could and still keep working and drawing a salary,” he said.

“If we had had the Kupuna Caregivers Assistance then, we could have used it to hire a trained female caregiver. I am sure my mother appreciated everything we did for her, but she would have welcomed having a woman to help her shower and dress. But we did the best we could to preserve her dignity,” he said.

Freitas took care of the bills his parents incurred as first his mother, then his father succumbed to illness. “My father became very ill shortly after my mother died, so my caregiving responsibilities continued even after my mother passed away. Dad did his best for my mom for as long as he could despite being ill–and nine months later, he was gone too.”

“I wish I had received better advice along the way,” he said. “For example, we did not know we could take advantage of a special fund set up at the hospital by a donor to help native Hawaiians until my mother passed away. I did not know what I had to pay and what I was no longer responsible for. So, I kept paying and paying, until long after she died,” she added.

Early habits of thrift and savings served him well. “Ever since I was little, I learned to save my lunch money. I used to caddy and instead of accepting a free lunch as a reward, I would ask for the cost of the lunch in cash instead and add that to my savings,” he explains. Those savings over many years allowed him to buy the comfortable, squeaky clean bungalow in Pauao that he lived in with his parents until they passed away. “I didn’t want to make my dad feel bad. So I did not tell him that I bought the house from my grandparents. But doing so meant they had no rent to pay and could spend their Social Security on other necessities. Their combined total social security was $538, and that’s all they got every month” he added.

Rex Freitas’ story is the story of thousands of unpaid family caregivers across Hawaii. Like so many others, Freitas was driven by the desire to do the best he possibly could for his parents.

Freitas’ caregiving story is the story of the search for dignity and respect and solidarity as we age that Ai-jen Poo writes about movingly in her book, The Age of Dignity. In arguing for the urgent necessity to build an infrastructure of care to support the swelling ranks of the elders in America, she says:

Turning to one another means rendering visible how we are already, and have always been, interconnected through care. Nearly as invisible as the oxygen we breathe, and yet just as essential, care is the beating heart of our nation.

Rex Freitas has not read the book. But he has lived its lessons. He looks forward to legislators in Hawaii feeling the same urgency to support caregivers who stretch themselves to perform well in their paid jobs while doing as well at their unpaid labor of love. He hopes fervently that SB534/HB607 will make it through the legislature this year.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

April 13, 2017 at 04:21AM

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from Dawn Morais

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49 Photos That Show What Autism Looks Like

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“Worry,” “fear,” “chaos,” “exhaustion,” “hope,” “love.” These are some of the many words parents of kids with autism spectrum disorder use to describe their reality. 

In honor of Autism Awareness Month, we asked the HuffPost Parents Facebook community to share what autism looks like in their families. While no two stories are identical, these parents wish for what everyone wants for their children: acceptance and joy.

Keep scrolling to see what autism looks like and read what it means for nearly 50 different families. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

April 13, 2017 at 03:31AM

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from Caroline Bologna

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‘The Resistance’ That Doesn’t Resist War

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Simultaneously with Trump’s Inauguration, the liberal “opposition” announced the beginning of “The Resistance” against Trump’s openly racist and xenophobic reign. Most notably, “The Resistance” protested in airports against Trump’s ban of immigrants from seven Muslim nations. I myself participated in such demonstrations.

Trump’s administration otherwise got off to a rocky start, with courts shooting down both of Trump’s attempts at the Muslim ban, with the White House in seeming disarray, with the failed attempt to repeal and replace “Obamacare,” and with Trump and his band of misfits becoming the butt of endless jokes. All of this helped pull Trump’s poll records down to record lows for this time in an Administration. But then, something happened – Trump bombed Syria on April 6. And, incredibly, he was cheered on by Republicans and Democrats alike, his polls shot up, and “The Resistance” was mute if not supportive of Trump’s “act of courage.” Trump the monster was now legit because he committed a monstrous act. Incredible!

But, of course, Trump had done a lot of bombing before his popular April 6 attack on Syria. Thus, less than two weeks before this particular bombing of Syria, he bombed Mosul, Iraq, killing nearly 300 people in what the LA Times described as “one of the largest attacks on civilians in recent memory.” Indeed, by some reports, Trump had killed around 1000 civilians in both Iraq and Syria in just the month of March alone.

Trump has also continued Obama’s policy of aiding and abetting Saudi Arabia in its one-sided, genocidal war upon Yemen, the poorest nation on earth, putting 7 million people at risk of imminent starvation.

In truth, at least judged by their actions, or inactions more specifically, the folks who make up “The Resistance” don’t care about Trump’s massacres of civilians in foreign lands, just as they didn’t care about Obama’s. But then, 70 civilians are killed in Syria by chemical attack, and now everyone cares. Indeed, they care so much that they applaud Trump for launching 59 Tomahawk missiles — named, of course, in honor of the tens of millions of Native Americans the U.S. slaughtered — in an action which, by all accounts, accomplished nothing but inflame tensions in an already tense region of the world. And, Trump was applauded for his aimless attack on Syria even though no investigation has taken place into who actually carried out the chemical attack.

The U.S. government and its compliant media ― who have lied us into nearly every war in memory ― said that Assad carried out the attack, and so it must be true. As a refresher, here is a partial list of the wars we have gotten into over the years and the lies which preceded them: Vietnam War (Gulf of Tonkin lie); First Gulf War (lie about Kuwaiti babies being thrown from incubators onto the floor); Second Gulf War (lie about WMDs); and destruction of Libya (lies about “black mercenaries” and Viagra-fueled rapes). Literally, millions have died based upon lies told by our government and “free” press.

However, that we have so often been tricked into war, and that the chemical attack suspiciously happened just one day after Trump said that we had to accept the idea of Assad as President of Syria were simply not fair game for comment. And those who have noted such pesky truths, and who have consequently asked for proof – for example, military veteran and Democratic Congressperson Tulsi Gabbard ― have been pilloried for daring to merely ask questions.

Of course, what we also dare not speak of is the U.S. massive use of chemical weapons in numerous theaters. Just to mention Vietnam, for example, conjures up the image of a country drowned in Agent Orange and Napalm by the United States, with babies continuing to be born with horrible birth defects as a result, and with the U.S. unwilling to help or compensate these victims. The U.S. also has used, and continues to use to this day, depleted uranium and white phosphorous in battle, causing a spike in birth defects and cancer rates, most notably in places like Fallujah, Iraq which now has cancer rates exceeding those of Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the nuclear bombing.

And yet, just after Trump bombed nearly 300 people to death in Mosul, most Americans, including those in “The Resistance,” were easily convinced about the rightness of U.S. military action in response to the death of 70 people in Syria. That the first, much larger group was killed by bombs and the smaller by chemicals seemed the difference for people, but innocents are dead just the same in either case. Trump “the liar” is now Trump “the bomber,” and so all is well again, we are told, in the American Republic. But things are not well at all.

That an unpopular President can improve his ratings just by bombing another country – at least if we are told that that country is deserving of such a bombing – while that same President’s massacring of civilians throughout the world is simply ignored, demonstrates that the American Republic is no more. We now live in the seat of a cruel, remorseless Empire which needs no credible justification for the violence it decides to rain down on the world. Who, I would ask, will save the world from us?

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

April 13, 2017 at 02:31AM

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from Dan Kovalik

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