Using corporate governance to settle personal scores? – Business Standard

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Business Standard

Using corporate governance to settle personal scores?
Business Standard
A few months earlier, various corporate governance issues were raised by warring parties in the battle between Ratan Tata and Cyrus Mistry. Allegations and counter-allegations flew thick and fast. The way these issues were raised only after a certain

May 29, 2017 at 11:55PM

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New National Maternity Hospital governance crisis resolved – Irish Medical Times (registration)

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Irish Medical Times (registration)

New National Maternity Hospital governance crisis resolved
Irish Medical Times (registration)
The Religious Sisters of Charity has relinquished its control of the St Vincent’s Healthcare Group (SVHG), including ownership or management of the proposed new National Maternity Hospital (NMH) on its Elm Park campus — home to St Vincent’s University …

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May 29, 2017 at 11:55PM

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PDP chieftain says strong opposition key to good governance – Guardian (blog)

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PDP chieftain says strong opposition key to good governance
Guardian (blog)
As Nigerians celebrate 18 years of democracy, Mr Alexander Mwolwus, a chieftain of the PDP in Pankshin, Plateau State, has called for a stronger opposition to keep leaders on their toes. “Every democracy needs the push and pressure of a virile opposition.

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May 29, 2017 at 08:12PM

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China Huishan Faces Corporate-Governance Meltdown – Wall Street Journal (subscription)

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China Huishan Faces Corporate-Governance Meltdown
Wall Street Journal (subscription)
One of China’s largest dairy companies is facing a corporate-governance meltdown: All of its board members except its chairman have left since a fateful day in March, when the company’s shares plunged 85% in a single trading session. The departures

May 29, 2017 at 07:16PM

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Citizenship office wants ‘Emma’ to help you

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Ryan Johnston at FedScoop: “U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services unveiled a new virtual assistant live-chat service, known as “Emma,” to assist customers and website visitors in finding information and answering questions in a timely and efficient fashion.

The agency told FedScoop that it built the chatbot with the help of Verizon and artificial intelligence interface company Next IT. The goal  is “to address the growing need for customers to obtain information quicker and through multiple access points, USCIS broadened the traditional call center business model to include web-based self-help tools,” the agency says.

USCIS, a component agency of the Department of Homeland Security, says it receives nearly 14 million calls relating to immigration every year. The virtual assistant and live-chat services are aimed at becoming the first line of help available to users of USCIS.gov who might have trouble finding answers by themselves.

The bot greets customers when they enter the website, answers basic questions via live chat and supplies additional information in both English and Spanish. As a result, the amount of time customers spend searching for information on the website is greatly reduced, according to USCIS. Because the virtual assistant is embedded within the website, it can rapidly provide relevant information that may have been difficult to access manually.

The nature of the bot lends itself to potential encounters with personally identifiable information (PII), or PII, of the customers it interacts with. Because of this, USCIS recently conducted a privacy impact assessment (PIA).

Much of the assessment revolved around accuracy and the security of information that Emma could potentially encounter in a customer interaction. For the most part, the chat bot doesn’t require customers to submit personal information. Instead, it draws its responses from content already available on USCIS.gov, relative to the amount of information that users choose to provide. Answers are, according to the PIA, verified by thorough and frequent examination of all content posted to the site.

According to USCIS, the Emma will delete all chat logs — and therefore all PII — immediately after the customer ends the chat session. Should a customer reach a question that it can’t answer effectively and choose to continue the session with an agent in a live chat, the bot will ask for the preferred language (English or Spanish), the general topic of conversation, short comments on why the customer wishes to speak with a live agent, and the case on file and receipt number.

This information would then be transferred to the live agent. All other sensitive information entered, such as Social Security numbers or receipt numbers, would then be automatically masked in the subsequent transfer to the live agent…(More)”

Full Post: Citizenship office wants ‘Emma’ to help you

May 29, 2017 at 05:52PM

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from Stefaan Verhulst

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Citizenship office wants ‘Emma’ to help you

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Ryan Johnston at FedScoop: “U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services unveiled a new virtual assistant live-chat service, known as “Emma,” to assist customers and website visitors in finding information and answering questions in a timely and efficient fashion.

The agency told FedScoop that it built the chatbot with the help of Verizon and artificial intelligence interface company Next IT. The goal  is “to address the growing need for customers to obtain information quicker and through multiple access points, USCIS broadened the traditional call center business model to include web-based self-help tools,” the agency says.

USCIS, a component agency of the Department of Homeland Security, says it receives nearly 14 million calls relating to immigration every year. The virtual assistant and live-chat services are aimed at becoming the first line of help available to users of USCIS.gov who might have trouble finding answers by themselves.

The bot greets customers when they enter the website, answers basic questions via live chat and supplies additional information in both English and Spanish. As a result, the amount of time customers spend searching for information on the website is greatly reduced, according to USCIS. Because the virtual assistant is embedded within the website, it can rapidly provide relevant information that may have been difficult to access manually.

The nature of the bot lends itself to potential encounters with personally identifiable information (PII), or PII, of the customers it interacts with. Because of this, USCIS recently conducted a privacy impact assessment (PIA).

Much of the assessment revolved around accuracy and the security of information that Emma could potentially encounter in a customer interaction. For the most part, the chat bot doesn’t require customers to submit personal information. Instead, it draws its responses from content already available on USCIS.gov, relative to the amount of information that users choose to provide. Answers are, according to the PIA, verified by thorough and frequent examination of all content posted to the site.

According to USCIS, the Emma will delete all chat logs — and therefore all PII — immediately after the customer ends the chat session. Should a customer reach a question that it can’t answer effectively and choose to continue the session with an agent in a live chat, the bot will ask for the preferred language (English or Spanish), the general topic of conversation, short comments on why the customer wishes to speak with a live agent, and the case on file and receipt number.

This information would then be transferred to the live agent. All other sensitive information entered, such as Social Security numbers or receipt numbers, would then be automatically masked in the subsequent transfer to the live agent…(More)”

Full Post: Citizenship office wants ‘Emma’ to help you

May 29, 2017 at 05:43PM

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from Stefaan Verhulst

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How can we study disguised propaganda on social media? Some methodological reflections

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Jannick Schou and Johan Farkas at DataDrivenJournalism: ’Fake news’ has recently become a seemingly ubiquitous concept among journalists, researchers, and citizens alike. With the rise of platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, it has become possible to spread deliberate forms of misinformation in hitherto unforeseen ways. This has also spilled over into the political domain, where new forms of (disguised) propaganda and false information have recently begun to emerge. These new forms of propaganda have very real effects: they serve to obstruct political decision-making processes, instil false narratives within the general public, and add fuel to already heated sites of political conflict. They represent a genuine democratic problem.

Yet, so far, both critical researchers and journalists have faced a number of issues and challenges when attempting to understand these new forms of political propaganda. Simply put: when it comes to disguised propaganda and social media, we know very little about the actual mechanisms through which such content is produced, disseminated, and negotiated. One of the key explanations for this might be that fake profiles and disguised political agendas are incredibly difficult to study. They present a serious methodological challenge. This is not only due to their highly ephemeral nature, with Facebook pages being able to vanish after only a few days or hours, but also because of the anonymity of its producers. Often, we simply do not know who is disseminating what and with what purpose. This makes it difficult for us to understand and research exactly what is going on.

This post takes its point of departure from a new article published in the international academic journal New Media & Society. Based on the research done for this article, we want to offer some methodological reflections as to how disguised propaganda might be investigated. How can we research fake and disguised political agendas? And what methodological tools do we have at our disposal?…

two main methodological advices spring to mind. First of all: collect as much data as you can in as many ways as possible. Make screenshots, take detailed written observations, use data scraping, and (if possible) participate in citizen groups. One of the most valuable resources we had at our disposal was the set of heterogeneous data we collected from each page. Using this allowed us to carefully dissect and retrace the complex set of practices involved in each page long after they were gone. While we certainly tried to be as systematic in our data collection as possible, we also had to use every tool at our disposal. And we had to constantly be on our toes. As soon as a page emerged, we were there: ready to write down notes and collect data.

Second: be willing to participate and collaborate. Our research showcases the immense potential in researchers (and journalists) actively collaborating with citizen groups and grassroots movements. Using the collective insights and attention of this group allowed us to quickly find and track down pages. It gave us renewed methodological strength. Collaborating across otherwise closed boundaries between research and journalism opens up new avenues for deeper and more detailed insights….(More)”

Full Post: How can we study disguised propaganda on social media? Some methodological reflections

May 29, 2017 at 05:43PM

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from Stefaan Verhulst

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