Possible minimax algorithm optimization in ai vs human games?

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To preface this, I am a high schooler who has been programming for about 4 years, I like to think I’m a competent programmer, so I probably won’t say something glaringly wrong, but if I do lmk so I can learn something new.

So I’m writing a chess AI and I’m using minimax and alpha-beta pruning (if there are other cool algorithms you can think of please also mention them in the comments :P) and I was thinking of other ways I could optimize the computer and I kinda realized that the ai wasn’t going to play a computer who can think 10 moves ahead, but rather a casual player who can think maybe 3-4 moves ahead. So why should the computer assume the opponent is always going to make the move that will minimize their loss several moves ahead when they will probably only think a few ahead? If the program assumes the human can only think 5 moves ahead (and even this is just to be safe, because really a person who thinks that far ahead and isn’t like a grandmaster would be scary) it can make moves that would maximize gain even more.

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May 29, 2017 at 09:48PM

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Banks Eager For Artificial Intelligence, But Slow To Adopt – Forbes

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Forbes

Banks Eager For Artificial Intelligence, But Slow To Adopt
Forbes
Yet only a few outliers in the banking sector, such as Capital One, have been able to ship AI products as quickly as their counterparts in Silicon Valley. While many financial institutions have publicly announced ambitious plans to integrate artificial

May 29, 2017 at 05:08PM

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Possible minimax algorithm optimization in ai vs human games?

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

To preface this, I am a high schooler who has been programming for about 4 years, I like to think I’m a competent programmer, so I probably won’t say something glaringly wrong, but if I do lmk so I can learn something new.

So I’m writing a chess AI and I’m using minimax and alpha-beta pruning (if there are other cool algorithms you can think of please also mention them in the comments :P) and I was thinking of other ways I could optimize the computer and I kinda realized that the ai wasn’t going to play a computer who can think 10 moves ahead, but rather a casual player who can think maybe 3-4 moves ahead. So why should the computer assume the opponent is always going to make the move that will minimize their loss several moves ahead when they will probably only think a few ahead? If the program assumes the human can only think 5 moves ahead (and even this is just to be safe, because really a person who thinks that far ahead and isn’t like a grandmaster would be scary) it can make moves that would maximize gain even more.

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May 29, 2017 at 02:17PM

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from /u/Ludwig0

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z

Possible minimax algorithm optimization in ai vs human games?

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

To preface this, I am a high schooler who has been programming for about 4 years, I like to think I’m a competent programmer, so I probably won’t say something glaringly wrong, but if I do lmk so I can learn something new.

So I’m writing a chess AI and I’m using minimax and alpha-beta pruning (if there are other cool algorithms you can think of please also mention them in the comments :P) and I was thinking of other ways I could optimize the computer and I kinda realized that the ai wasn’t going to play a computer who can think 10 moves ahead, but rather a casual player who can think maybe 3-4 moves ahead. So why should the computer assume the opponent is always going to make the move that will minimize their loss several moves ahead when they will probably only think a few ahead? If the program assumes the human can only think 5 moves ahead (and even this is just to be safe, because really a person who thinks that far ahead and isn’t like a grandmaster would be scary) it can make moves that would maximize gain even more.

submitted by /u/Ludwig0
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May 29, 2017 at 02:17PM

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z

from /u/Ludwig0

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z

Possible minimax algorithm optimization in ai vs human games?

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

To preface this, I am a high schooler who has been programming for about 4 years, I like to think I’m a competent programmer, so I probably won’t say something glaringly wrong, but if I do lmk so I can learn something new.

So I’m writing a chess AI and I’m using minimax and alpha-beta pruning (if there are other cool algorithms you can think of please also mention them in the comments :P) and I was thinking of other ways I could optimize the computer and I kinda realized that the ai wasn’t going to play a computer who can think 10 moves ahead, but rather a casual player who can think maybe 3-4 moves ahead. So why should the computer assume the opponent is always going to make the move that will minimize their loss several moves ahead when they will probably only think a few ahead? If the program assumes the human can only think 5 moves ahead (and even this is just to be safe, because really a person who thinks that far ahead and isn’t like a grandmaster would be scary) it can make moves that would maximize gain even more.

submitted by /u/Ludwig0
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May 29, 2017 at 02:17PM

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z

from /u/Ludwig0

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z

Possible minimax algorithm optimization in ai vs human games?

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

To preface this, I am a high schooler who has been programming for about 4 years, I like to think I’m a competent programmer, so I probably won’t say something glaringly wrong, but if I do lmk so I can learn something new.

So I’m writing a chess AI and I’m using minimax and alpha-beta pruning (if there are other cool algorithms you can think of please also mention them in the comments :P) and I was thinking of other ways I could optimize the computer and I kinda realized that the ai wasn’t going to play a computer who can think 10 moves ahead, but rather a casual player who can think maybe 3-4 moves ahead. So why should the computer assume the opponent is always going to make the move that will minimize their loss several moves ahead when they will probably only think a few ahead? If the program assumes the human can only think 5 moves ahead (and even this is just to be safe, because really a person who thinks that far ahead and isn’t like a grandmaster would be scary) it can make moves that would maximize gain even more.

submitted by /u/Ludwig0
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May 29, 2017 at 02:17PM

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z

from /u/Ludwig0

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z

Possible minimax algorithm optimization in ai vs human games?

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

To preface this, I am a high schooler who has been programming for about 4 years, I like to think I’m a competent programmer, so I probably won’t say something glaringly wrong, but if I do lmk so I can learn something new.

So I’m writing a chess AI and I’m using minimax and alpha-beta pruning (if there are other cool algorithms you can think of please also mention them in the comments :P) and I was thinking of other ways I could optimize the computer and I kinda realized that the ai wasn’t going to play a computer who can think 10 moves ahead, but rather a casual player who can think maybe 3-4 moves ahead. So why should the computer assume the opponent is always going to make the move that will minimize their loss several moves ahead when they will probably only think a few ahead? If the program assumes the human can only think 5 moves ahead (and even this is just to be safe, because really a person who thinks that far ahead and isn’t like a grandmaster would be scary) it can make moves that would maximize gain even more.

submitted by /u/Ludwig0
[link] [comments]

May 29, 2017 at 02:17PM

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z

from /u/Ludwig0

http://ift.tt/2rMVM4Z